Kids Politics

Photo by This American life

HONG KONG–I scanned the webpage of http://www.thisamericanlife.org trying to find some interesting topics. And luckilyI got it. A show named “Kid Politics” attracts me.

It starts with a documentary filmed in Wuhan, a central city China about eight year old kids selecting their monitor for the first time. To win the election, kids form into different campaign groups, candidates promise to profit the one who support him, parents play as brainpower to draw up strategy and even some political intrigues are seen.

A girl candidate, named Xiaofei, dances ballet in front of the class but some of her little classmates are not that friendly to her. “Xiaofei, Xiaofei, slowest eater. Xiaofei, Xiaofei, rotten gossip.” they taunt her. The girl cries. Her tear triggers regret and more tears. Her opponents come to apologize for the insulting.

This is an amazing scene to me. Kids, on one hand, try to imitate the way things work in the grown-up world. But they have instinctive sympathy and an innocent heart. To win the election, they take a mean and improper method, and soon they feel guilty.

Act one and two are also very interesting. But Act three is the one that I enjoy most. Act three tells a story about a school where there is no homework, no grade and no exam. The two things students must do is to come to school and attend the weekly democratic meeting. Here kids decide everything about how the school is run.

In the meeting, there are many finger points, talks, suggestions and ideas. But the interesting thing is the students actually will not remember what they said when a new day comes. The rules that have made go into hollow words. But according to a teacher, the point of this kind meeting is to let students express.

For me, I think it’s inspiring. Treating kids as game players makes them feel important and their voice heard. Being participated, voicing their ideas and listening to different opinions, these practice enhance kids’ impression towards citizenship society and satisfy their little esteem.

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